Overview – Sunday – April 5

10:45am – 12:00pm

WALKING TOUR OF OXFORD UNIVERSITY

Meet in the lobby of The Randolph Hotel, Oxford (Beaumont St, Oxford) at 10.30am where we will be met by our guides. The tour will finish at 12.00pm at Rhodes House, where conference registration will take place.

Learn about the story of Oxford on this tailored tour. You will be shown the area’s famous buildings and its little-known treasures, granting you access to the insides of some of its best-known landmarks and bringing the secrets of this inspiring city to life.

Onsite contact for the tour:

Emma Brodie
[email protected]
+61 435 023004

12:00pm – 12:20pm

LIGHT LUNCH AND REGISTRATION

Rhodes House
South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3RG

Rhodes House

Rhodes House is a hidden delight in the heart of Oxford. It is designed in the style of a Cotswold mansion and has been the gathering place for Rhodes Scholars and their distinguished guests for nearly 100 years.

Oxford

The University of Oxford is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England. It has no known date of foundation, but there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world’s second-oldest university in continuous operation. It grew rapidly from 1167, when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. The history and influence of the University of Oxford has made it one of the most prestigious in the world.

Oxford is made up of a variety of institutions, including 38 constituent colleges and a full range of academic departments, which are organised into four divisions. All the colleges are self-governing institutions within the university, each controlling its own membership and with its own internal structure and activities. As a city university, it does not have a main campus; instead, its buildings and facilities are scattered throughout the city centre.

The university operates the world’s oldest university museum, the largest university press in the world and the largest academic library system in Britain. Oxford has educated many notable alumni, including 69 Nobel laureates, 28 prime ministers of the United Kingdom and many heads of state and government from around the world. Oxford is also home of the Rhodes Scholarship, one of the world’s oldest international scholarships.

Onsite Contact

Emma Brodie
[email protected]
+61 435 023004

12:20pm – 12:30pm

WELCOME

12:30pm – 1:15pm

POLICY UPDATE: EU TAXONOMIES, COP26 AND THE JOURNEY TO CARBON NEUTRALITY BY 2050

This session will highlight the success of the European Union in developing taxonomies, a common language and new rules for financial markets, for environmentally sustainable investments and hear from investors who are using the taxonomies to deliver climate alignment in portfolios. Extrapolating on this it will examine the steps needed for the success of carbon neutrality by 2050.

Craig Mackenzie

Head of strategic asset allocation, Aberdeen Standard Investments (United Kingdom)

Joel Prohin

Head of portfolio management, Caisse des Depots et Consignations (France)

Nancy Saich

Chief climate change expert, European Investment Bank (Luxembourg)

Chair

Nathan Fabian

Chief responsible investment officer, PRI; rapporteur, EU taxonomy, EU technical expert group on sustainable finance (United Kingdom)

1:15pm – 2:00pm

SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP

This session will hear from leaders in sustainability investing and the journey they have taken over the past 30 years. How have they invested in people and research and what are the most important aspects of leadership and culture? Where is sustainability heading and what can these leaders teach about the path forward?

Eloy Lindeijer

Head of investment management, PGGM (The Netherlands)

Gilbert van Hassel

Chief executive, Robeco (The Netherlands)

Chair

Colin Tate

Chief executive, Conexus Financial (Australia)

2:00pm – 2:45pm

RUNAWAY SOLUTIONS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

Research at Oxford University, built on decades of complex systems science, is exploring sensitive intervention points in climate change and how modest changes in the socio economic and political system can deliver massive, fast impact. It looks at case studies across technology, mass mobilisation and finance where small interventions might have a big impact.

Cameron Hepburn

Professor of Environmental Economics, Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment; Director of the Economics of Sustainability Programme, Institute for New Economic Thinking, Oxford Martin School; fellow at New College, Oxford; managing editor, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University (United Kingdom)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

2:45pm – 3:15pm

AFTERNOON TEA

The Marquee, Rhodes House

South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RG

3:15pm – 4:00pm

DEFINING AN ENVIRONMENTAL INVESTMENT UNIVERSE WITHIN PLANETARY BOUNDARIES

Created by a research group at the Stockholm Resilience Centre, the Planetary Boundaries framework is a model that defines the ecological “safe operating space” within which human activities should take place for humanity to continue to develop and thrive for generations to come. The panel will explore what this concept entails and how institutional investors can use it to generate returns whilst contributing to the protection of the planet over the long term.

Sarah Cornell

Global change researcher, Docent in Sustainability Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre (Sweden)

Steve Freedman

Senior product specialist, thematic strategies, Pictet Asset Management (Switzerland)

Mark Mansley

Chief investment officer, Brunel Pension Partnership (United Kingdom)

Chair

Colin Tate

Chief executive, Conexus Financial (Australia)

4:00pm – 4:45pm

WHAT ESG MEANS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

Environmental, social and governance challenges remain huge in some emerging markets due in part to a lack of transparency and good data. So how should investors assess the risk of investing in emerging markets and consider an ESG lens? This session considers different approaches including an exploration of the foundational perquisites to achieving ESG and the link between economic freedom and economic growth.

Philipp Aerni

Director, Center for Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability, University of Zurich (Switzerland)

Majdi Chammas

Head of external asset management, AP1 (Sweden)

Marshall Stocker

Head of country research, emerging markets debt, Eaton Vance (United States)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

4:45pm – 5:30pm

INTEGRATING FINANCIAL AND IMPACT GOALS INTO SAA

Investors are increasingly seeking to design strategic portfolios that both achieve financial goals (return & risk) and have environmental, social, and governance impact. Karen Karniol-Tambour will discuss how to engineer an asset allocation that delivers consistent performance and that furthers the UN SDGs at institutional scale.

Karen Karniol-Tambour

Head of research, Bridgewater (United States)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

6:00pm – 9:00pm

WELCOME FUNCTION

Bodleian Library
Broad Street, Oxford, OX1 3RG

Delegates will enjoy drinks and a casual dinner immediately following Day 1 of the symposium at the historic Bodleian Library. You will also be treated to a private tour of the famous Duke Humfrey’s library.

The Bodleian is one of the world’s oldest libraries and is at the heart of Oxford’s historic university. The library opened in 1602 and has since been used as a working library belonging to the University of Oxford. It is a masterpiece of English Gothic architecture. With more than 12 million items, it is the second-largest library in Britain, after the British Library. Known to Oxford scholars as ‘Bodley’ or ‘the Bod’, it operates principally as a reference library and, in general, documents may not be removed from the reading rooms.

Onsite contact:
Emma Brodie
[email protected]
+61 435 023004

Day 2 – Monday – April 6

8:00am – 8:15am

REGISTRATION

8:15am – 8:20am

WELCOME

 

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

8:20am – 9:00am

GLOBAL RISK OUTLOOK

The extreme uncertainty of the global economy requires a new risk management framework.

Lakshmi Shyam-Sunder

Chief risk officer, World Bank Group (United States)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

9:00am – 10:30am

SYSTEMIC GEOPOLITICAL RISKS

Geopolitical risk is hard to price, and even harder to predict, but it has the potential to affect portfolios in a profound way. This session examines the crisis points, which include Taiwan and its potential to undermine the entire China/US relationship.

INCLUDES ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION

Stephen Kotkin

John P Birkelund ’52 Professor in History and International Affairs, Princeton University; senior fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University (United States)

Chair

Colin Tate

Chief executive, Conexus Financial (Australia)

10:30am – 11:00am

MORNING TEA

The Marquee, Rhodes House

South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RG

11:00am – 11:35am

CHINA AND AI

Deciphering China’s AI dream: the context, components, capabilities and consequences of China’s strategy to lead the world in AI.

Jeffrey Ding

China lead, Center for the Governance of AI, Future of Humanity Institute, Oxford University (United States)

Chair

Alex Proimos

Institutional content producer, Conexus Financial (Australia)

11:35am – 12:20pm

INVESTING IN CHINA IN AN AGE OF UNCERTAINTY

The narrative around investing in China centers around trade wars, politics and monetary policy but to what extent do fundamentals matter? How should institutional investors be thinking about China in the context of long-term investing and the changing nature of the global economy? What are the most important but least discussed considerations for investing in China/Asia? This session will explore the risks and opportunities of investing in China and seeks to provide an understanding of the country’s economic, cultural and historical importance.

Mary Pieterse-Bloem

Endowed professor of financial markets, Erasmus School of Economics (The Netherlands)

Ramana Ramaswamy

Senior portfolio manager, macro strategies, CPPIB (Canada)

Chair

Vis Nayar

Chief investment officer, Europea and UK, HSBC Global Asset Management (United Kingdom)

12:20pm – 1:20pm

LUNCH

The Marquee, Rhodes House

South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RG

1:20pm – 2:00pm

THE ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF BREXIT

Whether Brexit is judged to be success or not will depend to some degree on its economic impact. The OECD has warned that the a no-deal departure would significantly damage the economy and leave the US more exposed to a global downturn. This session will explore the potential economic impacts to the UK, to the broader European market and OECD countries.

Iain Begg

Professorial Research Fellow and co-director, Dahrendorf Forum, European Institute, London School of Economics (United Kingdom)

Karen Ward

Global strategist, JP Morgan Asset Management (United Kingdom)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

2:00pm – 3:00pm

POSITIONING PORTFOLIOS IN TIMES OF UNCERTAINTY

The investment environment continues to be uncertain with the deleveraging of debt, populism, the balance between monetary and fiscal policies, the changing nature of the global macro economic environment, and the structural vulnerabilities within financial markets. This session will take an in-depth look at how to position portfolios given these challenges and guide investors through possible scenarios for risk management and alpha generation.

INCLUDES ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION

Bige Kahraman Alper

Associate professor of finance, Said Business School, Oxford University (United Kingdom)

Simon Pilcher

Chief executive of USS Investment Management; CIO, USS (United Kingdom)

Gene Podkaminer

Head of research strategies, multi-asset solutions, Franklin Templeton (United States)

Chair

Alex Proimos

Institutional content producer, Conexus Financial (Australia)

3:00pm – 3:30pm

AFTERNOON TEA

3:30pm – 4:15pm

GEOPOLITICS FIRESIDE CHAT

David Young founded Oxford Analytica in 1975, and it has grown to be a pre-eminent geopolitical analysis and consulting firms with long-term clients including the World Bank and the European Parliament and numerous private sector organisations. Young worked for the Nixon administration as special assistant at the National Security Council and was an administrative assistant for Henry Kissinger. He has been a lecturer in politics at Oxford (Queens College) since 1974 and has been analysing and assessing risk for nearly 50 years. This fireside chat will garner Young’s views on the risks in the global economy.

David Young

Founder, Oxford Analytica (United States)

Chair

Colin Tate

Chief executive, Conexus Financial (Australia)

4:15pm – 6:00pm

WORKSHOP: SCENARIO PLANNING

In this interactive session, Oxford Analytica will illustrate how to build scenarios and alternative futures using a range of analytical tools and methodologies. Scenarios are not intended to replace the consideration of major driving trends but are instead designed to consider how major trends and systems might combine to produce different outcomes in the future. The process of deriving scenarios enables us to think about what could happen, rather than we expect to happen -- and whether long-term plans are sufficiently resilient to be successful if an alternative scenario emerges.

The workshop will commence with Oxford Analytica’s team discussing scenario planning techniques and reflecting on cognitive biases. They will illustrate which factors are fixed, which are uncertain, who they affect and how they might interact to produce a plausible scenario. This will be followed by an interactive session with the audience to build alternative futures by further exploring:

  • construction of causally coherent and internally consistent descriptions of future outcomes using qualitative methods;
  • identifying cognitive biases and how to overcome them;
  • discussing patterns that could grow into major disruptions and how those may affect the future.

Laura James

Senior Middle East analyst, Oxford Analytica (United Kingdom)

Amalia Khachatryan

Deputy director of advisory, Oxford Analytica (United Kingdom)

Chair

Colin Tate

Chief executive, Conexus Financial (Australia)

7:00pm – 9:30pm

OFFICIAL CONFERENCE DINNER

Wadham College
Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PN

Join us for dinner in the majestically beautiful 400-year-old Wadham College Dining Hall with its long tables, oak panelling and a soaring, vaulted ceiling in the hammer beam style.

Founded in 1610, following Nicholas Wadham’s death. Nicholas had left his fortune to endow a college at Oxford and his widow Dorothy, a formidable woman in her 70’s, ensured that his intention became a reality, and that the money was not otherwise taken by his relations.

Dorothy purchased the site and drew up all the statutes herself as well as appointing the first Warden, Fellows and Scholars. She kept a tight control of the college until her own death. Opened as a male only college, it wasn’t until 1974 that statutes were changed to allow women to join the college.

Onsite Contact:
Emma Brodie
[email protected]
+61 435 023004

Day 3 – Tuesday – April 7

7:30am – 9:00am

SPONSOR-ONLY BREAKFAST

7:30am – 9:00am

INVESTOR-ONLY BREAKFAST

The Marquee, Rhodes House

South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RG

9:30am – 10:15am

VISUALISING AND ENACTING PURPOSE: NEW ATTITUDES AND SKILLS

There are broad calls for corporations and investors to embrace models of stakeholder capitalism and to incorporate a wider range of considerations into investment criteria.  How do we turn these mandates into reality?  How do we use powerful visual techniques to move beyond our traditional discussions? What skills and attitudes are necessary for businesses and investors to carry out these new demands?

Peter Tufano

Dean, Said Business School, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

10:15am – 11:15am

PURPOSEFUL COMPANIES – ESG AND COMPANY PERFORMANCE SHORT AND LONG TERM

What is the paradigm shift needed to redefine business for the 21st century and build trust between business and society?

INCLUDES ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION

Janine Guillot

Chief executive, SASB (United States)

Molly Morgan Jones

Director of policy, British Academy (United Kingdom)

David Whiteley

Global head of external relations, IFM Investors (Australia)

Chair

Fiona Reynolds

Chief executive, PRI (United Kingdom)

11:15am – 11:35am

MORNING TEA

The Marquee, Rhodes House

South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RG

11:35am – 12:35pm

ASSET MANAGEMENT, OLIGOPOLIES AND MONOPSONY POWER

The wave of capital in passive investment strategies has raised questions about the role and responsibilities of asset managers given the significant capital they control. Concerns of market dominance have also been echoed in a number of industries displaying oligopolistic characteristics. This session discusses how legal models in association with asset owners can work to democratise shareholder ownership, reduce industry concentration and monosopony power.

Denise Hearn

Co-chair First Principles; co-author The Myth of Capitalism: Monopolies and the Death of Competition (United States)

Martin Schmalz

Associate Professor of Finance, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

Chair

Alex Proimos

Institutional content producer, Conexus Financial (Australia)

12:15pm – 1:15pm

CULTURE IN THE 2020S

The last decade has seen a shift in corporate culture to include remote and flexible work options and social activism, among other trends. What will shakeup work in the next decade (pay transparency or gender quotas?) and how should organisations be positioning themselves for the future?

Tania Boler

Founder, Elvie (United Kingdom)

Chris Hulatt

Founder, Octopus (United Kingdom)

Chair

Colin Tate

Chief executive, Conexus Financial (Australia)

1:15pm – 2:00pm

LUNCH

The Marquee, Rhodes House

South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RG

2:00pm – 2:35pm

DATA CASE STUDY

In 2013 the Wisconsin State Investment Board discovered its backoffice was not keeping up with the investment group’s investments which included hedge funds, unconstrained portfolios and leverage. This began a technology and data journey which will culminate in the fund spinning out a multi-asset portfolio to a hedge fund platform in June 2020. Once it is built 90 per cent of the $100 billion portfolio will move into that infrastructure. This session will look at the costs and opportunities of changing legacy technology systems, what happens when investments are moved out of the custody system (you need a lot of fintech) and what internal resources are required to manage such a transformation.

David Villa

CIO, Wisconsin State Investment Board (United States)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

2:35pm – 3:05pm

INNOVATIVE RESPONSES TO CONTRIBUTING TO SDGS – USING AI

A new AI-driven SDG platform  rates up to 10,000 companies on the extent to which their core business activity helps create, for example, sustainable cities (SDG 11) or generate clean energy (SDG 7) in a novel approach that brings a new level to standardisation and efficiency to SDG portfolio management in fixed income and equity. The AI-driven technology sifts through reams of structured and unstructured data to gauge the extent to which companies’ products and activities meet the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Claudia Kruse

Managing director global responsible investment and governance, APG (The Netherlands)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

3:05pm – 3:50pm

VIRTUAL WEAPON: CYBER SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL ORDER

What is the benchmark for the truth if information becomes suspect? Everyone in finance needs to rely on information but how is it possible to have an accurate view of the world if information is suspect? The cyber revolution is the revolution of modern times, and the rapid expansion of cyberspace in society brings both promise and peril. What does this mean for cyber incidents and why should investors be paying attention?

Lucas Kello

Associate Professor of International Relations; director, Centre for Technology and Global Affairs, Oxford University (United Kingdom)

Chair

Alex Proimos

Institutional content producer, Conexus Financial (Australia)

3:50pm – 4:00pm

CLOSING COMMENTS

4:00pm

CONFERENCE CLOSE

Day 1 – Sunday – April 5

10:45am – 12:00pm

WALKING TOUR OF OXFORD UNIVERSITY

Meet in the lobby of The Randolph Hotel, Oxford (Beaumont St, Oxford) at 10.30am where we will be met by our guides. The tour will finish at 12.00pm at Rhodes House, where conference registration will take place.

Learn about the story of Oxford on this tailored tour. You will be shown the area’s famous buildings and its little-known treasures, granting you access to the insides of some of its best-known landmarks and bringing the secrets of this inspiring city to life.

Onsite contact for the tour:

Emma Brodie
[email protected]
+61 435 023004

12:00pm – 12:20pm

LIGHT LUNCH AND REGISTRATION

Rhodes House
South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3RG

Rhodes House

Rhodes House is a hidden delight in the heart of Oxford. It is designed in the style of a Cotswold mansion and has been the gathering place for Rhodes Scholars and their distinguished guests for nearly 100 years.

Oxford

The University of Oxford is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England. It has no known date of foundation, but there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world’s second-oldest university in continuous operation. It grew rapidly from 1167, when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. The history and influence of the University of Oxford has made it one of the most prestigious in the world.

Oxford is made up of a variety of institutions, including 38 constituent colleges and a full range of academic departments, which are organised into four divisions. All the colleges are self-governing institutions within the university, each controlling its own membership and with its own internal structure and activities. As a city university, it does not have a main campus; instead, its buildings and facilities are scattered throughout the city centre.

The university operates the world’s oldest university museum, the largest university press in the world and the largest academic library system in Britain. Oxford has educated many notable alumni, including 69 Nobel laureates, 28 prime ministers of the United Kingdom and many heads of state and government from around the world. Oxford is also home of the Rhodes Scholarship, one of the world’s oldest international scholarships.

Onsite Contact

Emma Brodie
[email protected]
+61 435 023004

12:20pm – 12:30pm

WELCOME

12:30pm – 1:15pm

POLICY UPDATE: EU TAXONOMIES, COP26 AND THE JOURNEY TO CARBON NEUTRALITY BY 2050

This session will highlight the success of the European Union in developing taxonomies, a common language and new rules for financial markets, for environmentally sustainable investments and hear from investors who are using the taxonomies to deliver climate alignment in portfolios. Extrapolating on this it will examine the steps needed for the success of carbon neutrality by 2050.

Craig Mackenzie

Head of strategic asset allocation, Aberdeen Standard Investments (United Kingdom)

Joel Prohin

Head of portfolio management, Caisse des Depots et Consignations (France)

Nancy Saich

Chief climate change expert, European Investment Bank (Luxembourg)

Chair

Nathan Fabian

Chief responsible investment officer, PRI; rapporteur, EU taxonomy, EU technical expert group on sustainable finance (United Kingdom)

1:15pm – 2:00pm

SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP

This session will hear from leaders in sustainability investing and the journey they have taken over the past 30 years. How have they invested in people and research and what are the most important aspects of leadership and culture? Where is sustainability heading and what can these leaders teach about the path forward?

Eloy Lindeijer

Head of investment management, PGGM (The Netherlands)

Gilbert van Hassel

Chief executive, Robeco (The Netherlands)

Chair

Colin Tate

Chief executive, Conexus Financial (Australia)

2:00pm – 2:45pm

RUNAWAY SOLUTIONS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

Research at Oxford University, built on decades of complex systems science, is exploring sensitive intervention points in climate change and how modest changes in the socio economic and political system can deliver massive, fast impact. It looks at case studies across technology, mass mobilisation and finance where small interventions might have a big impact.

Cameron Hepburn

Professor of Environmental Economics, Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment; Director of the Economics of Sustainability Programme, Institute for New Economic Thinking, Oxford Martin School; fellow at New College, Oxford; managing editor, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University (United Kingdom)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

2:45pm – 3:15pm

AFTERNOON TEA

The Marquee, Rhodes House

South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RG

3:15pm – 4:00pm

DEFINING AN ENVIRONMENTAL INVESTMENT UNIVERSE WITHIN PLANETARY BOUNDARIES

Created by a research group at the Stockholm Resilience Centre, the Planetary Boundaries framework is a model that defines the ecological “safe operating space” within which human activities should take place for humanity to continue to develop and thrive for generations to come. The panel will explore what this concept entails and how institutional investors can use it to generate returns whilst contributing to the protection of the planet over the long term.

Sarah Cornell

Global change researcher, Docent in Sustainability Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre (Sweden)

Steve Freedman

Senior product specialist, thematic strategies, Pictet Asset Management (Switzerland)

Mark Mansley

Chief investment officer, Brunel Pension Partnership (United Kingdom)

Chair

Colin Tate

Chief executive, Conexus Financial (Australia)

4:00pm – 4:45pm

WHAT ESG MEANS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

Environmental, social and governance challenges remain huge in some emerging markets due in part to a lack of transparency and good data. So how should investors assess the risk of investing in emerging markets and consider an ESG lens? This session considers different approaches including an exploration of the foundational perquisites to achieving ESG and the link between economic freedom and economic growth.

Philipp Aerni

Director, Center for Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability, University of Zurich (Switzerland)

Majdi Chammas

Head of external asset management, AP1 (Sweden)

Marshall Stocker

Head of country research, emerging markets debt, Eaton Vance (United States)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

4:45pm – 5:30pm

INTEGRATING FINANCIAL AND IMPACT GOALS INTO SAA

Investors are increasingly seeking to design strategic portfolios that both achieve financial goals (return & risk) and have environmental, social, and governance impact. Karen Karniol-Tambour will discuss how to engineer an asset allocation that delivers consistent performance and that furthers the UN SDGs at institutional scale.

Karen Karniol-Tambour

Head of research, Bridgewater (United States)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

6:00pm – 9:00pm

WELCOME FUNCTION

Bodleian Library
Broad Street, Oxford, OX1 3RG

Delegates will enjoy drinks and a casual dinner immediately following Day 1 of the symposium at the historic Bodleian Library. You will also be treated to a private tour of the famous Duke Humfrey’s library.

The Bodleian is one of the world’s oldest libraries and is at the heart of Oxford’s historic university. The library opened in 1602 and has since been used as a working library belonging to the University of Oxford. It is a masterpiece of English Gothic architecture. With more than 12 million items, it is the second-largest library in Britain, after the British Library. Known to Oxford scholars as ‘Bodley’ or ‘the Bod’, it operates principally as a reference library and, in general, documents may not be removed from the reading rooms.

Onsite contact:
Emma Brodie
[email protected]
+61 435 023004

Day 2 – Monday – April 6

8:00am – 8:15am

REGISTRATION

8:15am – 8:20am

WELCOME

 

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

8:20am – 9:00am

GLOBAL RISK OUTLOOK

The extreme uncertainty of the global economy requires a new risk management framework.

Lakshmi Shyam-Sunder

Chief risk officer, World Bank Group (United States)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

9:00am – 10:30am

SYSTEMIC GEOPOLITICAL RISKS

Geopolitical risk is hard to price, and even harder to predict, but it has the potential to affect portfolios in a profound way. This session examines the crisis points, which include Taiwan and its potential to undermine the entire China/US relationship.

INCLUDES ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION

Stephen Kotkin

John P Birkelund ’52 Professor in History and International Affairs, Princeton University; senior fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University (United States)

Chair

Colin Tate

Chief executive, Conexus Financial (Australia)

10:30am – 11:00am

MORNING TEA

The Marquee, Rhodes House

South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RG

11:00am – 11:35am

CHINA AND AI

Deciphering China’s AI dream: the context, components, capabilities and consequences of China’s strategy to lead the world in AI.

Jeffrey Ding

China lead, Center for the Governance of AI, Future of Humanity Institute, Oxford University (United States)

Chair

Alex Proimos

Institutional content producer, Conexus Financial (Australia)

11:35am – 12:20pm

INVESTING IN CHINA IN AN AGE OF UNCERTAINTY

The narrative around investing in China centers around trade wars, politics and monetary policy but to what extent do fundamentals matter? How should institutional investors be thinking about China in the context of long-term investing and the changing nature of the global economy? What are the most important but least discussed considerations for investing in China/Asia? This session will explore the risks and opportunities of investing in China and seeks to provide an understanding of the country’s economic, cultural and historical importance.

Mary Pieterse-Bloem

Endowed professor of financial markets, Erasmus School of Economics (The Netherlands)

Ramana Ramaswamy

Senior portfolio manager, macro strategies, CPPIB (Canada)

Chair

Vis Nayar

Chief investment officer, Europea and UK, HSBC Global Asset Management (United Kingdom)

12:20pm – 1:20pm

LUNCH

The Marquee, Rhodes House

South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RG

1:20pm – 2:00pm

THE ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF BREXIT

Whether Brexit is judged to be success or not will depend to some degree on its economic impact. The OECD has warned that the a no-deal departure would significantly damage the economy and leave the US more exposed to a global downturn. This session will explore the potential economic impacts to the UK, to the broader European market and OECD countries.

Iain Begg

Professorial Research Fellow and co-director, Dahrendorf Forum, European Institute, London School of Economics (United Kingdom)

Karen Ward

Global strategist, JP Morgan Asset Management (United Kingdom)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

2:00pm – 3:00pm

POSITIONING PORTFOLIOS IN TIMES OF UNCERTAINTY

The investment environment continues to be uncertain with the deleveraging of debt, populism, the balance between monetary and fiscal policies, the changing nature of the global macro economic environment, and the structural vulnerabilities within financial markets. This session will take an in-depth look at how to position portfolios given these challenges and guide investors through possible scenarios for risk management and alpha generation.

INCLUDES ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION

Bige Kahraman Alper

Associate professor of finance, Said Business School, Oxford University (United Kingdom)

Simon Pilcher

Chief executive of USS Investment Management; CIO, USS (United Kingdom)

Gene Podkaminer

Head of research strategies, multi-asset solutions, Franklin Templeton (United States)

Chair

Alex Proimos

Institutional content producer, Conexus Financial (Australia)

3:00pm – 3:30pm

AFTERNOON TEA

3:30pm – 4:15pm

GEOPOLITICS FIRESIDE CHAT

David Young founded Oxford Analytica in 1975, and it has grown to be a pre-eminent geopolitical analysis and consulting firms with long-term clients including the World Bank and the European Parliament and numerous private sector organisations. Young worked for the Nixon administration as special assistant at the National Security Council and was an administrative assistant for Henry Kissinger. He has been a lecturer in politics at Oxford (Queens College) since 1974 and has been analysing and assessing risk for nearly 50 years. This fireside chat will garner Young’s views on the risks in the global economy.

David Young

Founder, Oxford Analytica (United States)

Chair

Colin Tate

Chief executive, Conexus Financial (Australia)

4:15pm – 6:00pm

WORKSHOP: SCENARIO PLANNING

In this interactive session, Oxford Analytica will illustrate how to build scenarios and alternative futures using a range of analytical tools and methodologies. Scenarios are not intended to replace the consideration of major driving trends but are instead designed to consider how major trends and systems might combine to produce different outcomes in the future. The process of deriving scenarios enables us to think about what could happen, rather than we expect to happen -- and whether long-term plans are sufficiently resilient to be successful if an alternative scenario emerges.

The workshop will commence with Oxford Analytica’s team discussing scenario planning techniques and reflecting on cognitive biases. They will illustrate which factors are fixed, which are uncertain, who they affect and how they might interact to produce a plausible scenario. This will be followed by an interactive session with the audience to build alternative futures by further exploring:

  • construction of causally coherent and internally consistent descriptions of future outcomes using qualitative methods;
  • identifying cognitive biases and how to overcome them;
  • discussing patterns that could grow into major disruptions and how those may affect the future.

Laura James

Senior Middle East analyst, Oxford Analytica (United Kingdom)

Amalia Khachatryan

Deputy director of advisory, Oxford Analytica (United Kingdom)

Chair

Colin Tate

Chief executive, Conexus Financial (Australia)

7:00pm – 9:30pm

OFFICIAL CONFERENCE DINNER

Wadham College
Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PN

Join us for dinner in the majestically beautiful 400-year-old Wadham College Dining Hall with its long tables, oak panelling and a soaring, vaulted ceiling in the hammer beam style.

Founded in 1610, following Nicholas Wadham’s death. Nicholas had left his fortune to endow a college at Oxford and his widow Dorothy, a formidable woman in her 70’s, ensured that his intention became a reality, and that the money was not otherwise taken by his relations.

Dorothy purchased the site and drew up all the statutes herself as well as appointing the first Warden, Fellows and Scholars. She kept a tight control of the college until her own death. Opened as a male only college, it wasn’t until 1974 that statutes were changed to allow women to join the college.

Onsite Contact:
Emma Brodie
[email protected]
+61 435 023004

Day 3 – Tuesday – April 7

7:30am – 9:00am

SPONSOR-ONLY BREAKFAST

7:30am – 9:00am

INVESTOR-ONLY BREAKFAST

The Marquee, Rhodes House

South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RG

9:30am – 10:15am

VISUALISING AND ENACTING PURPOSE: NEW ATTITUDES AND SKILLS

There are broad calls for corporations and investors to embrace models of stakeholder capitalism and to incorporate a wider range of considerations into investment criteria.  How do we turn these mandates into reality?  How do we use powerful visual techniques to move beyond our traditional discussions? What skills and attitudes are necessary for businesses and investors to carry out these new demands?

Peter Tufano

Dean, Said Business School, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

10:15am – 11:15am

PURPOSEFUL COMPANIES – ESG AND COMPANY PERFORMANCE SHORT AND LONG TERM

What is the paradigm shift needed to redefine business for the 21st century and build trust between business and society?

INCLUDES ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION

Janine Guillot

Chief executive, SASB (United States)

Molly Morgan Jones

Director of policy, British Academy (United Kingdom)

David Whiteley

Global head of external relations, IFM Investors (Australia)

Chair

Fiona Reynolds

Chief executive, PRI (United Kingdom)

11:15am – 11:35am

MORNING TEA

The Marquee, Rhodes House

South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RG

11:35am – 12:35pm

ASSET MANAGEMENT, OLIGOPOLIES AND MONOPSONY POWER

The wave of capital in passive investment strategies has raised questions about the role and responsibilities of asset managers given the significant capital they control. Concerns of market dominance have also been echoed in a number of industries displaying oligopolistic characteristics. This session discusses how legal models in association with asset owners can work to democratise shareholder ownership, reduce industry concentration and monosopony power.

Denise Hearn

Co-chair First Principles; co-author The Myth of Capitalism: Monopolies and the Death of Competition (United States)

Martin Schmalz

Associate Professor of Finance, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

Chair

Alex Proimos

Institutional content producer, Conexus Financial (Australia)

12:15pm – 1:15pm

CULTURE IN THE 2020S

The last decade has seen a shift in corporate culture to include remote and flexible work options and social activism, among other trends. What will shakeup work in the next decade (pay transparency or gender quotas?) and how should organisations be positioning themselves for the future?

Tania Boler

Founder, Elvie (United Kingdom)

Chris Hulatt

Founder, Octopus (United Kingdom)

Chair

Colin Tate

Chief executive, Conexus Financial (Australia)

1:15pm – 2:00pm

LUNCH

The Marquee, Rhodes House

South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RG

2:00pm – 2:35pm

DATA CASE STUDY

In 2013 the Wisconsin State Investment Board discovered its backoffice was not keeping up with the investment group’s investments which included hedge funds, unconstrained portfolios and leverage. This began a technology and data journey which will culminate in the fund spinning out a multi-asset portfolio to a hedge fund platform in June 2020. Once it is built 90 per cent of the $100 billion portfolio will move into that infrastructure. This session will look at the costs and opportunities of changing legacy technology systems, what happens when investments are moved out of the custody system (you need a lot of fintech) and what internal resources are required to manage such a transformation.

David Villa

CIO, Wisconsin State Investment Board (United States)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

2:35pm – 3:05pm

INNOVATIVE RESPONSES TO CONTRIBUTING TO SDGS – USING AI

A new AI-driven SDG platform  rates up to 10,000 companies on the extent to which their core business activity helps create, for example, sustainable cities (SDG 11) or generate clean energy (SDG 7) in a novel approach that brings a new level to standardisation and efficiency to SDG portfolio management in fixed income and equity. The AI-driven technology sifts through reams of structured and unstructured data to gauge the extent to which companies’ products and activities meet the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Claudia Kruse

Managing director global responsible investment and governance, APG (The Netherlands)

Chair

Amanda White

Director of institutional content, Conexus Financial (Australia)

3:05pm – 3:50pm

VIRTUAL WEAPON: CYBER SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL ORDER

What is the benchmark for the truth if information becomes suspect? Everyone in finance needs to rely on information but how is it possible to have an accurate view of the world if information is suspect? The cyber revolution is the revolution of modern times, and the rapid expansion of cyberspace in society brings both promise and peril. What does this mean for cyber incidents and why should investors be paying attention?

Lucas Kello

Associate Professor of International Relations; director, Centre for Technology and Global Affairs, Oxford University (United Kingdom)

Chair

Alex Proimos

Institutional content producer, Conexus Financial (Australia)

3:50pm – 4:00pm

CLOSING COMMENTS

4:00pm

CONFERENCE CLOSE